The One Who Imagined it All

For a couple of years some of my friends and I have been sharing music. We’re supposed to review/rate what gets shared with us, and share those reviews with the group, but that doesn’t always happen.

George Harrison – Somewhere in England (1981)

Much like before they broke up, after The Beatles broke up, George and Ringo never seem to get the attention they deserve. John got the most coverage. Paul still has a decent career, but I like George’s solo material the most. Continue reading

The Worst Songs of All Time

Months ago, one of my old coworkers found a NPR podcast where they discuss the worst songs of all time. They do admit that all of these songs are really well known songs and divisive. Some people (even some of the panelists) love some of these songs. And many are by really well known, successful artists. But, in the podcast, they argue that when a great artist comes out with even a half-horrible song, it’s worse because of the expectation factor. The horrible songs by the unknown artists never get attention, because of course they’re terrible. That’s why those artists never got famous.

The song the used as an example? Continue reading

Late in the Night, Your Shadow Falls between Us

For almost two years, some of my friends and I have been sharing music. We’re supposed to review/rate what gets shared with us, and share those reviews with the group, but that doesn’t always happen.

Gentle Giant – Octopus (1972)

Here’s a loose concept album by prog. contemporaries of last week‘s Yes. The concept was a song about each of the six members of the band. Except they ended up with eight tunes. And the title is a pun on that, specifically the eight (octo-) musical works (opus, the plural of which is opera, which gets confusing to us modern, non-native Latin speakers to whom opera is a very specific thing). Continue reading

She’s Gone, and She’s Wearing Your Red Sweater

For almost two years, some of my friends and I have been sharing music. We’re supposed to review/rate what gets shared with us, and share those reviews with the group, but that doesn’t always happen.

Some weeks are heavier or more dense than other weeks. Not that this week was whipped cream, but it was lighter.

Greg Kihn Band – RocKihnRoll (1981)

When Tim shared this album, he made me feel like I should have heard The Breakup Song before. But I haven’t. Tim will be flabbergasted. Continue reading

I’m Not the One You Thought You Knew Back in High School

For more than a year, some of my friends and I have been sharing music. We’re supposed to review/rate what gets shared with us, and share those reviews with the group, but that doesn’t always happen.

This week I shared an album that follows in the same vein as my suggestion from last week. But first, here’s what my friends shared:

Michael Jackson – Thriller (1982)

Scott is also continuing from his suggestion from last week. Which means I’m steadily going backwards through MJ’s core discography. I fully expect someone to share Off the Wall sometime in the future. Although to be honest, I look forward to the stuff before that more – the spin-off Jackson 5 Motown soul stuff as opposed to the solo ’80s disco pop funk stuff.

I know it’s the ’80s and there were synths and by my 2015 standards they are dated and not so good. Unless otherwise stated, I’d prefer to hear the song with more “timeless” keyboard sounds. Continue reading

Each Time, It’s Different

For almost a year now, some of my friends and I have been sharing an album with one another, partly for exposure to new music and partly to give us something to listen to while we work, etc. We’re supposed to review it, rate it, and share those reviews/ratings with one another as well, but that doesn’t always happen.

Grizzly Bear – Yellow House (2006)

When Chris shared this album, he said it had a very rustic, almost ghostly feel to it – the audio equivalent of looking at an old-timey black and white photo.

I don’t know if it feels quite that old to me, but it at times it does feel very much like late ’60s/early ’70s psychedelic folk rock. But only at times. Most of the album was simply well done modern indie folk rock. Continue reading

And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make

I do not know if you saw the 54th Grammy Awards or not. This was my favorite bit.

Paul McCartney and his back up band (Rusty Anderson on guitar, Brian Ray on bass and Abe Laboriel, Jr. on drums) performed the last medley on Abbey Road.

But that is not all. For “The End,” Bruce Springsteen (from Bruce Springsteen), Dave Grohl (from Nirvana, Foo Fighters and Them Crooked Vultures) and Joe Walsh (from The Eagles) came out and joined them.

From L to R: The Boss, Joe, Rusty, Paul, Dave and Brian.

Continue reading